Prostate health is a huge issue for men. Did you know one in seven Canadian men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime, making it the most common cancer in men?


The need for greater public education is why the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Canada designated September as Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, a month dedicated toward engaging and connecting everyone around a disease that affects us all on some level.

While deaths from prostate cancer have dropped by approximately 40% over the past 20 years, an estimated 4,100 Canadian men will die from the disease in 2017 alone. Here is some general information about prostate cancer to consider:


While any man can develop prostate cancer, you may be at a high risk if you are…

Over 50: Age is the strongest risk factor for prostate cancer. Your risk increases starting at age 50, and most cases are diagnosed in men over age 65. Prostate Cancer Canada recommends that men in their 40s get a PSA test to establish their baseline. If you think you are at increased risk, talk to your doctor before age 40.

Have a family history of prostate cancer: Your risk is higher if a first-degree relative (father or brother) has had prostate cancer. Your risk increases with each additional first-degree relative who has the disease.

African or Caribbean: Prostate cancer is more common among men in these ethnic groups. (Men of Asian descent have lower risk.)

Overweight: Achieving and maintaining a healthy weight reduces your risk. Regular exercise and a nutritious diet are important to overall well-being.

Do not have a healthy diet: Men who eat a low-fibre, high-fat diet are more likely to develop prostate cancer. Saturated fats may increase testosterone production and promote the growth of prostate cancer cells.


Signs And Symptoms:

Common signs and symptoms of prostate cancer may include:

  • Difficulty urinating
  • Urgent need to urinate
  • Frequent urination, especially at night
  • Burning or pain when urinating
  • Inability to urinate or difficulty starting or stopping urine flow
  • Painful ejaculation
  • Blood in the urine or semen

Symptoms are not always present especially in the early stages of prostate cancer.  If detected and treated in its earliest stages (when cells are only in the prostate), your chances of survival are greatly increased.  Early detection is key.   

Members of our Niagara Health teams have a message for all of the men out there in this video:


For more information visit the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Canada’s website here:

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